The Importance of Variable Cost Structures in Medical Practices

Posted by Clark Love on Nov 13, 2017 6:35:43 PM

When it comes to medical practice, the cost of doing business can be vastly different than for other small businesses. While building revenue is important, so is effective customer service and high-quality patient care. As the model for reimbursement changes, efficient cost management is becoming a key component of the survival and stability of the independent medical practice. Here, the types of costs associated with medical practices will be discussed, as well as why the variable cost structure is important.

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Topics: General Urology Information, Medical Practice Operations

UroCuff vs. Urodynamics – How They Fit Together and Are Complimentary

Posted by Clark Love on Nov 2, 2017 9:51:44 PM

Urodynamics Explained

Urodynamics is a blanket term for a series of tests that assess the functionality of the lower urinary tract. Numerous 

problems of the bladder and urethra which commonly affect both men and women can be diagnosed via urodynamics. Typically, these tests are ordered to diagnose issues such as urinary incontinence or prostrate problems, as well as before and after any type of surgery involving the pelvic organs or the urinary tract. Common symptoms that result in a doctor ordering urodynamics include incontinence, frequent urination, inability to urinate, weak urine stream, painful urination, nocturia, recurrent urinary tract infections, and difficulties emptying the bladder entirely.  The types of urodynamic tests commonly performed include the following:

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Topics: urodynamics, UroCuff

When should Anorectal Manometry (ARM) Typically Be Prescribed

Posted by Clark Love on Oct 27, 2017 2:31:21 PM

Anorectal manometry is a diagnostic technique that is intended to test how well the rectum and anal sphincter are functioning. In the blog post below, when this test is commonly prescribed, as well as an explanation of the procedure, will be described.


What is Anorectal Manometry?

Anorectal manometry is a minimally invasive diagnostic procedure that is simple to perform, but it requires complex equipment and well trained nursing staff. This test is used to measure the patient’s contractility in his or her anus and rectum. A catheter with a balloon attached is inserted directly into the patient’s rectum. The balloon is inflated, and pressure readings from the sphincter and rectum are recorded. One purpose of anorectal manometry is to test the ability of the muscles and tissues surrounding the balloon is to relax in response to pressure. For instance, if rectal muscles and sphincter do not relax when the balloon is inflated, paralysis of the colon could be to blame.

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Topics: Anorectal Manometry Testing, Anorectal Manometry

Case Study: How Urodynamics Saved Sarah’s Life

Posted by Clark Love on Oct 20, 2017 11:42:53 AM

In many instances, urodynamics are performed to diagnose relatively benign lower urinary tract disorders, such as stress urinary incontinence. However, sometimes urodynamics uncovers more serious diseases that require immediate attention, as was the case with Sarah, a 48 year old mother of three from New York. Here, we will share Sarah’s story about unexpectedly finding out she had cervical cancer after a routine urodynamics test.

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Topics: Urodynamics Testing

Case Study: How A Large Urology Practice Should Outsource Urodynamics

Posted by Clark Love on Oct 16, 2017 2:34:59 PM

The term outsourcing tends to have a negative connotation, with immediate thoughts of lost jobs to lower-income workers. However, in the medical field there are many reasons to outsource certain tasks and testing, which not only saves costs but allows medical personnel to have a more singular focus throughout their workday. Here, ways in which a large urology practice should outsource urodynamics by utilizing a qualified vendor to provide diagnostic testing will be discussed.

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Topics: urodynamics, Medical Practice Operations

The Primary Sources of Patient Complaints in ObGyn & Urology Practices

Posted by Clark Love on Oct 2, 2017 1:20:28 PM

In today’s medical marketplace, physicians such as urologists and ObGyns are finding it more and more difficult to keep doors open in the face of deceased reimbursements and patients who lack medical insurance. Additionally, attracting new patients is harder than ever, thanks to the prevalence of websites which allow patients to rate their doctors, sometimes leaving bad reviews which do not adequately depict the situation from both sides.

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Topics: ObGyn Practices, Medical Practice Operations

Urodynamics:  Travel Time/Distance And Impacts On No-Show Rates

Posted by Clark Love on Sep 18, 2017 2:21:19 PM

Patients that do not show up for their appointments are a major problem in healthcare. Not only do these no-shows prevent other patients from scheduling appointments, but they put their own health at risk. Frustratingly, they also cost medical practices money, as an absent patient also represents a lost opportunity for revenue – up to $300 per missed appointment. There are many factors that affect no-show rates, including travel time to the doctor’s office. Here, the solution to the all too common problem will be discussed.

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Topics: Urodynamics Testing, urodynamics, Medical Practice Operations

How To Know Your Urodynamics Test Results Are Poor

Posted by Clark Love on Sep 13, 2017 7:02:00 AM

Urodynamics testing is as much an art as it is a science. Unfortunately, there are many variables inherent to the way testing takes place that can lead to poor results. Here, how to know whether your urodynamics test results are poor will be discussed.

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Topics: Urodynamics Testing, urodynamics, urodynamics interpretation

Urodynamics for Spina Bifida Patients

Posted by Clark Love on Sep 8, 2017 12:19:22 PM

Spina bifida patients have unique needs related to urologic care due to the nature of this disease. Here, routine urodynamics care for patients with spina bifida will be discussed.

 

What is Spina Bifida

Spina bifida1 is a birth defect that is characterized by the incomplete closing of the backbone and associated membranes around the spinal cord. While the lower back is the most common location for spina bifida, in rare instances children may experience this disorder in the neck or thoracic spine.

The mildest form of spinal bifida is occulta2, in which children are asymptomatic or have very mild symptoms. In this instance, children commonly have a spot on their back where a gap in the spine is located, such as a dimple, dark spot, swelling, or a hairy patch.

Meingocele is more serious than spina bifida occulta, but generally only causes mild problems due to the sac of fluid that is present at the spinal gap.

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Topics: Urodynamics Testing, Pediatric Urodynamics, Spina Bifida

5 Marketing Hacks for Urology Practices

Posted by Clark Love on Aug 29, 2017 2:18:53 PM

Did you know that 72% of ALL U.S. Internet users have gone online in the past year specifically for health-related information.  Additionally,  77% of that group (i.e. 77% of the 72%) say their research started at Google, Bing or another general search engine - not web portals like WebMD or HealthGrades.  What are you doing to drive your business's growth online?

Small business owners know the value of marketing, so why don’t more doctors and urologists perfect this art? In short, there simply isn’t enough time in the day for most urologists to engage in effective marketing. Here, five marketing hacks for urology practices will be discussed, which can change the flow of your business and help you with marketing.

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Topics: urology, urology practice marketing